Cranes and heavy construction have long been stereotyped as “men’s work,” and the demographics of the industry could enforce that perception. The industry is fairly dominated by men. But that perception is changing, as more and more women are establishing themselves as driving forces within their companies and within the industry as a whole.
It took three construction seasons, but the Upper Cambie Bridge has been replaced. The $7.7-million project began in May 2015, involving the replacement of the aging bridge located on the summit of Highway 3 (Crowsnest), east of Allison Pass, and west of the Manning Park Resort, about 60 kilometres east of Hope, B.C.
As Canada moves towards legalizing marijuana for recreational use, cranes are poised to gain a foothold in a budding new industry.
This past May, Calgary’s historic 12th Street S.E. Bridge was removed. The “Zoo Bridge”, which leads to an island in the middle of the Bow River, was constructed in 1908 as part of an agreement between the Federal Government and the City of Calgary. Since the age of the bridge began to become a significant logistic challenge, Mammoet were contracted, via Pomerleau/Westpro, to remove the bridge to make way for a replacement.
With the Alberta government opening the door to wind and other renewable energy projects, cranes could be in for some heavy lifting.
In preparation for the 20th anniversary celebrations, the Crane Rental Association of Canada (CRAC) is accepting applications for its new Safety Awards. The criteria and application form can be found on the CRAC website. The Safety Awards are open to member crane rental companies and companies receiving the awards will be listed on the CRAC website and covered in partner publications.
Cranes continue to flock to one of Canada’s biggest infrastructure projects. With a projected $4.239-billion cost, the 3.3-kilometre Champlain Bridge crosses the St. Lawrence Seaway has been attracting a steady who’s who of cranes.
The Port of Prince Rupert is ready to service the largest vessels in the ocean.
To say that Terex Cranes’ Demag AC 40 City crane was a popular item for crane operators would be a serious understatement. After all, more than 1,000 of the AC 40 models were sold within one year of its arrival into the marketplace. Given the crane’s popularity, it wasn’t surprising to witness the unveiling of the AC 45 City crane during Terex Cranes’ recent product launch in Demag’s hometown of Zweibrücken, Germany.
Mini-cranes cranes are proving to be a good fit for the Latta brothers at Up & Down Lifting Solutions in Ontario.
The addition of an overhead crane has paid dividends for a Dartmouth, N.S. machine shop. When Ace Machining outgrew its previous home base, the owners had a new 14,500-sq.-ft. facility built to their specifications, including the installation of a Yale Global King electric wire overhead hoist. Co-owner and co-operator Ron Wallace says that the new facilities and the new crane have not only provided the company with breathing room, but have allowed the business to grow.
A tight work space and high winds posed a dual challenge for a crew installing a giant air conditioning system in downtown Windsor, Ont.
Danfoss Power Solutions has added two high-flow proportional valves to its PVG portfolio, expanding its range of low to high-flow capabilities for OEM customers with demanding applications. The PVG 128 and PVG 256 valves are designed to easily integrate with the existing line of Danfoss high performance proportional valves — PVG 16 and PVG 32 — allowing modularity from low to high hydraulic flow within the same valve stack.
DICA will exhibit several products from its FiberMax, SafetyTech, and ProStack product lines at the Specialized Carriers & Rigging Association’s annual conference, April 17 to 21, in Boca Raton, Fla.
Offices with the best view to the city are highly coveted by the executives of large companies.
Terex’s new RT 100US rough terrain crane was designed with specifically to meet customer needs.
Omaha Standard Palfinger is announcing the release of its newest mechanics body, the PAL Pro 20, at North America’s largest work truck event, the NTEA Work Truck Show, from March 7 to 9 in Indianapolis, Ind.
Hiab, the leading on-road load handling provider and part of Cargotec, renowned for HIAB loader cranes, MOFFETT and Princeton truck mounted forklifts and its nationwide service network, announces the launch of MULTILIFT demountables and hooklifts to the U.S. market this week at the Work Truck Show, March 6 to 9, 2018 in Indianapolis, Ind.
Raimondi Cranes SpA, established in 1863, has announced a transformative approach to heavy lifting technology, the luffing jib LR330. Showcased to Raimondi’s exclusive agent network ahead of wider release, the LR330 luffing jib crane will officially begin shipping in March to fulfill agent presell orders, and is now available for wider purchasing. 
Sarens is expanding and updating its current fleet with the addition of 44 new Demag all terrain cranes that are scheduled to be built and delivered over the next two years.
Terex Cranes recently introduced the newest addition to its growing tower crane family, the Terex CTT 472-20 flat top tower crane. This new Terex 20-tonne (22-U.S.-ton) class crane expands maximum jib length to 80 metres (262.5 ft.) and increases load charts over previous models offering the same lift capacity on the whole jib length, with a maximum load at the full length of the jib tip of 4 tonnes (4.4 U.S. tons).
Tadano has extended its product range with the GR-1200XL/GR-1100EX, its largest two-axle rough terrain crane in their rough terrain crane line-up. The crane boasts a maximum lifting capacity of 120 US tons (110 metric tons), and a boom measuring 183.7 feet (56m).
Iowa Mold Tooling Co., Inc., an Oshkosh Corporation company, recently introduced four new articulating crane models and revisions to its current articulating crane lineup.
Combining a great look with productivity and comfort in a single product is not normally a simple task, especially when it comes to construction machinery. However, the new CUBE cab in Linden Comansa’s tower cranes combines these three qualities, while bearing in mind that the cab is a work space and, as such, productivity should always be the No. 1 requirement.
During the Crane Rental Association of Canada’s (CRAC) 2017 annual general meeting this past June, Ted Redmond was named the new chairman of CRAC.
When Mike Turnbull was offered the opportunity to join the Crane Rental Association of Canada’s executive board as treasurer and secretary last year, he was more than happy to take on those roles.
Darren Ritchie is a Canadian golf champion and, as of June 2016, a member of the New Brunswick Sports Hall of Fame. When operating the cranes on job sites with Irving Equipment, however, he says he’s just another guy in a hard hat.
New overhead cranes are key features of the recent expansion project of a New Brunswick heavy equipment attachment maker.
All those forms that employees are filling out aren’t doing a crane company any good if they’re simply placed in a filing cabinet and forgotten, says Adrian Bartha.
Over 100 years ago, Hawboldt Industries was founded in Chester, N.S. At its inception, the company used its foundry to produce equipment and vessels for the cod fishery. However, in the decades since, Hawboldt has evolved with the times and the market. Its most recent evolution: producing marine cranes.
For the first time in more than a decade, tower crane professionals across British Columbia came together for the Tower Crane Industry Safety Conference, hosted by WorkSafeBC at the Sheraton Vancouver Airport Hotel in Richmond, B.C. on March 15, 2018.
Since the federal government announced that it would be decriminalizing marijuana for recreational purposes in July 2018, a mixed reaction has come from the provinces and territories, and across the public and private sectors.
According to the highly recognized Canadian crane safety organizations like the B.C. Association for Crane Safety, the ideal scenario is for crane organizations to establish an employee mindset to proactively engage all workforce members in the creation of a safe work environment.
A successful fleet safety program takes proper planning, communication, time and resources… but in the long run the benefits to your crane company are significant.
When a crane company tries to improve or re-engineer its safety management systems, it has to develop a planning process that will move the organization forward as it changes. This planning process needs to be activity driven … with daily, weekly, and monthly activities defined and consistently executed. Additionally, according to the Canadian Standards Association, effective safety management systems development should include “annual and multi-year planning to ensure an organization’s safety culture is consistently maintained and your overall safety management system is effective in identification and control of hazards and associated risks.”
It seems that the term “excellence” as it applies to risk management in the Canadian crane market commonly is misunderstood and poorly defined.
When the federal government first announced it was doubling down on infrastructure spending in the 2016 Budget - $60 billion in additional funds over 10 years for the construction of new transport and energy systems - one could feel an increase optimismfrom Canada’s construction sector. After all, more money for infrastructure spending should translate into more available contracts for everyone to bid on and create more employment opportunities in the sector, right?Well, so far this appears to be true - at least as far as overall employment numbers in the sector go. According to Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey, November 2017, employment in the construction sector was up 16,000, enjoying its second straight month of gains. But more importantly, that latest boost in employment brought the year-over-year gains in the sector to 50,000 jobs (or an increase of 3.6 per cent). Sounds like the feds’ plan to build employment through infrastructure investment is working, but it may have some issues. An additional $60 billion over 10 years is a lot of money to add to the funds already earmarked for projects, and that additional injection of cash may be creating a bottleneck for getting the funds where they need to go.According to recent articles by various news outlets across the country, the federal government is experiencing delays in getting funding for infrastructure spending out the doors of the federal treasury, about $2.14 billion worth of delays. The articles are based on a report that states that of the $5.3 billion that Infrastructure Canada had planned to spend in its last fiscal year (ended on March 31, 2017), that approximately 40 per cent of those funds were not spent. According to an article by the Toronto Star, about $1.48 billion of the $2.14 billion that was not spent was earmarked for “various large-scale projects, representing about 90 per cent of what the government expected to spend on things like new transit and water systems.” The Liberals argue that they are managing the flow of money to projects (which, of course, is expected of them); while the opposition critics have argued that the frozen funds are symptoms of a larger problem related to the federal government’s long-term infrastructure program. To be fair to the feds, some project delays (and therefore, spending delays) are completely out of their control. Some of the projects they pegged for funding have been delayed due to labour issues and bad weather.And since payment is often not released until projects are completed, the money has nowhere to go. And when projects are completed, the federal government sometimes requires receipts from cities and provinces before releasing funding, which creates additional delays. That said, it sounds like there may be a piece or two missing from the Liberals’ infrastructure program’s spending chain for getting the funding where it needs to go in an efficient manner.With such a significant increase in funding earmarked for projects, perhaps more resources are required at various government levels to get all these receipts where they need to go? Whether its an increase in administrative staff at the municipal, provincial or federal levels, improved software programs for processing receipts, or an overhaul of the entire workflow processes for funding releases, the federal government may need to figure out quicker methods to get the money in the hands of the right people so it can hit its spending targets.Despite the slower pace to the release of funds, the feds’ infrastructure plan does appear to be helping the construction sector’s employment levels move in the right direction. And if the employment levels are moving in the right direction, then contracts are being awarded. And if contracts are being awarded, then the equipment purchase orders and rental orders are being submitted.Here’s to a prosperous 2018.
One the most startling revelations for a Canadian visitor to ConExpo-Con/Agg in Las Vegas this March was just how optimistic Americans we spoke with are about the new presidential administration in the U.S.
The election of Donald Trump as president of the United States has profound impacts for Canada’s economy. That’s because this country’s economic health depends heavily on trade.
It’s great that after over two years of work by the non-profit Asia Pacific Skills Table, and an infusion of nearly $800,000 in taxpayer money, a national demonstration of skills tests for mobile crane operators is ready to be put into action.
Something had to give with Vancouver’s overheated housing market. With the price of the average home soaring above $1.5 million, the B.C. government has imposed a 15 per cent surtax on buyers from outside Canada. Foreign buyers, especially those from mainland China, have been widely blamed for feeding the frenzied price increases.
The wildfire that struck Fort McMurray Alberta in early May and forced the evacuation of the entire city of nearly 90,000 people caught the world’s attention.
Nobody needs to be reminded that Canada’s economy is facing serious challenges. Nowhere are these challenges felt more severely at present than in Alberta.
Safety in heavy lifting has been a recurring theme for straight years now at the annual Crane & Rigging Conference Canada in Edmonton.
It’s difficult, if not impossible to predict the future. Well, astronomers can predict with great accuracy the timing of eclipses. But prognosticators in most other areas of human endeavor are about as accurate as astrologers.
Cranes are essential for large-scale construction projects in Canada, providing lifting power that makes the construction of roads, big buildings, and other major projects possible. Crane injuries and deaths happen in unfortunately high numbers each year, and almost all are preventable. 
Konecranes Training Institute has raised the level of its game in a major way with a move from the original location of 43 years to a new 13,000-square-foot facility adjacent to Konecranes service branch in New Berlin, Wis. Konecranes also has its nuclear and modernization groups located nearby.
The Crane Certification Association of America will hold its annual educational conference from March 18 to 20 in Tulsa, Oklahoma.
The 2018 Specialized Carriers and Rigging Association (SC&RA) Annual Conference will be held at the Boca Raton Resort in Boca Raton, Fla. from April 17 to 21 and is predicted to attract hundreds of the industry’s leading owners, CEOs and top managers.
The Specialized Carriers & Rigging Association (SC&RA) drew more than 630 attendees to Kansas City, Mo. for the SC&RA’s 40th annual Crane & Rigging Workshop, which took place at the Sheraton Kansas City Hotel at Crown Center.
Leavitt Machinery has acquired Alberta-based training company Crane Safety Limited. A representative for Leavitt says that the purchase, which was made official June 1, 2017, brings more expertise to their offerings.
Finishing touches have been put on a new tower crane and six-storey steel support structure at the Operating Engineers Training Institute of Ontario (OETIO) campus in Oakville, Ont.

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